I read comics. So should you.

Posts Tagged ‘Southern Bastards’

The Stack-1/11/17

In new books on January 11, 2017 at 11:27 pm

stack02

Ah, now THIS is more like it. This week had something for everyone: comics based on your favorite movies, comics based on your favorite 80s cartoons, comics based on your favorite 80s vampire films, comics based on your favorite TV shows about biker gangs or time traveling British people, and that thing where, for some unholy reason, the Justice League met the Power Rangers. Then there’s the crap that I like:

Shipwreck #3 (Warren Ellis, Phil Hester, Eric Gapstur, Mark Englert, Marshall Dillon-Aftershock): Warren Ellis has always been a writer drawn to big ideas. It’s just that he’s drawn to the disturbing and revolutionary and ahead-of-the-curve ones. He flirts with the fringes, something alien gets stuck in his craw, and then he uses his words to explore and ultimately beat it into submission. This title is no exception. For two issues it was just draped in more mystery than we’re used to. But now the picture is getting clearer, and it involves developing the technology to move humanity into another dimension, before the Earth farts and annihilates every last trace of how cool we are. And clear or no, that picture is stunning thanks to the artists working on this book. Lines are stark and jagged, and colors carefully chosen, nearly monochromatic palettes.

Southern Bastards #16 (Jason Aaron, Jason Latour, Jared K. Fletcher-Image): Goddamn I love this comic. And I’m not from the south, and I’m not a football fan. THAT’S how good it is. The Jasons are pulling some serious Game of Thrones shit here with Coach Boss, and I’m eating it up like it’s slathered in red-eye gravy. It would have been so easy to just have someone like Roberta Tubb beat his skull in, but watching him and his team lose game after game, even after doing some truly heinous things in order to cheat, is so much more satisfying. And there is now a character who looks like Burt Reynolds, talks like Foghorn Leghorn, and owns a monkey… so there’s THAT. In addition, this is the issue with the anti-harassment variant created to raise money for the Southern Poverty Law Center and the ACLU, and I will gladly throw money at anything which goes to a good cause AND gives the finger to bullies.

God Country #1 (Donny Cates, Geoff Shaw, Jason Wordie, John J. Hill-Image): Now THIS is a juxtaposition that I very much enjoy: the heartbreaking tragedy of dementia, thwarted by a huge magic sword spit out of a freak tornado. The two parts of this tale are handled so well that they actually feel natural together. You feel the pain that the Quinlans are going through, and you also have a deep desire to see Emmett kill lots of evil things with his absurd Final Fantasy-esque blade. I’m really digging Geoff Shaw’s art, too. It’s got pinches of R.M. Guéra and Nate Powell in it, which is a very good thing, indeed.

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #16 (Ryan North, Will Murray, Erica Henderson, Rico Renzi, Travis Lanham-Marvel): This is the super-silly and cute corner of the Marvel universe, and I realize that it’s either your thing or it isn’t, but if it isn’t it really SHOULD be. I mean, WHY DO YOU HATE FUN?! Anyway, this issue celebrates Doreen’s 25th anniversary in comics, and gives another glimpse into her early years. Monkey Joe expresses his love of peanut butter. Hulk acts like a big grumpy ingrate. Loki is exactly the sort of gift-giver that you’d expect. Then it all wraps up in true Marvel fashion, with a post-letters page sequence to tease amazing things to come. I’m glad comics has characters like this, characters who can poke some fun at superheroes and still be inspiring and not just be another version of stupid Deadpool.

That’s all for now. Please feel free to share your favorites in the comments section, and I’ll be dropping Part Two of my art-related recommendations in a few days. Support your local comic shop!