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Posts Tagged ‘Unfollow’

The Stack-3/29/17

In new books, rants, reviews on March 30, 2017 at 9:48 pm

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This week in comics: A tear-filled goodbye, the current Zeitgeist Level is ‘Shitstorm Brown’, and somehow Snagglepuss sparks a fierce debate about art styles. Before we begin, I have a burning question:

 

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Can we knock it off with this ‘director’s cut’ horseshit already? Using the terminology of another medium, particularly when it is a total misnomer, doesn’t become us, darlings.

Spider-Woman #17 (Dennis Hopeless, Veronica Fish, Rachelle Rosenberg, Andy Fish, VC’s Travis Lanham, Javier Rodriguez-Marvel): After going through trials and tribulations both deeply personal and extra punchy, Jessica Drew is ready to take a break and settle down with baby Gerry and her new beau Roger, the man formerly known as Porcupine. What writer Dennis Hopeless brought to this title that truly set it apart from nearly everything else on the shelves was heart. He chronicled the highs and lows of a burgeoning super-family, and did it without being saccharine or disingenuous. I enjoyed issue after issue of baby mama drama, and I am not a fan of babies whatsoever. What the various artists involved brought to this title was no less important: Inventive page layouts, expressive character work, and an overall aesthetic that was a refreshingly bright nod to the classics. This book was its own unique corner of the Marvel universe, and its presence will be missed. Enjoy the downtime, Arachnid Lady. You have certainly earned it.

Unfollow #17 (Rob Williams, Mike Dowling, Quinton Winter, Clem Robins, Matt Taylor-DC/Vertigo): Up to this point, Unfollow has sunk its hook into us with a very juicy directive: Imagine that a single genius introduced the world to social media, and that he is dying from cancer, and wants to play a game with us to see what we’re made of. That game involved giving away his fortune to random users of his platform, provided they could survive each other long enough to enjoy it. Recently, the game has changed. SPOILERS Our genius billionaire, Larry Ferrell, has sent his cancer into remission and had an epiphany: People have misused his tech, they are lost without it, and this money is HIS. He plans to simply kill off the remaining 140 chosen ones himself, and get back to being an ‘alpha’. It’s a twist that makes a frightening amount of sense. Rob Williams and his crew have crafted a top notch wake-up call, and I suspect there are even more surprises in store.

Clean Room #17 (Gail Simone, Walter Geovani, Quinton Winter, Todd Klein, Jenny Frison-DC/Vertigo): Next, we sidestep over to another fantastic Vertigo book, where oddly enough, the Internet has also gone dark. Oh shit–SPOILERS Whoops. The difference is, it is the terrifyingly silent opening salvo in the war between demonic entities and humans. They’re hiding among us, and they are now savoring every last bit of chaos, confusion, and suspicion that the panicked masses are experiencing. Meanwhile, in the Clean Room, Astrid is schooling the murderous stalker who has penetrated her inner circle, and is preparing for a showdown with the entity child who wants her broken and destroyed. Gail Simone is talented, funny, and prolific. She also has a dark side, and she is expressing it in a fascinating way. I want more, provided it does not manifest in horrifying ways, like it did with Grant Morrison (look up the story behind his comic, The Invisibles).

Cinema Purgatorio #9 (Alan Moore, Kevin O’Neill, Garth Ennis, Raulo Caceres, Digikore Studios, Max Brooks, Gabriel Andrade, Kieron Gillen, Nahuel Lopez, Christos Gage, Kurt Hathaway-Avatar Press): I have been meaning to discuss this excellent anthology book for months now, so let’s dive in. The main story is really just a chance for the always enchanting and cantankerous Alan Moore to dissect the dark underbelly of film and animation, in a way that only someone fucked over by that same machine can. Garth Ennis’ Code Pru is about the way we make the horror of life banal in order to contain it. A More Perfect Union is a historical fiction gorefest about armies of giant ants emerging during the time of the Civil War. Modded is quite simply Pokemon in a post apocalyptic wasteland, changing out cute monsters for actual demons. And The Vast is a kaiju story focusing on the arms race between nations trying to train giant monsters by getting them to imprint on humans when they’re babies. If you are a fan of horror and gorgeous black and white artwork that stands up on its own, you need to be reading this.

Infamous Iron Man #6 (Brian Michael Bendis, Alex Maleev, Matt Hollingsworth, VC’s Clayton Cowles-Marvel): Would you care to know where the most exciting things are happening over at Marvel? They’re happening over in the ‘silly’ wing, with books like The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl. They’re happening in Jason Aaron’s Thor books. They’re happening in books that address mental health issues, like Moon Knight and Hulk. And they are happening wherever The Bendis is. Spider-Man, Jessica Jones, and the Iron Man world are amazing. Go ahead, call me an ass-kissing fanboy. It’s true and you know it. What can I say? Marvel is in rare form, and their best bald boy is leading the charge, despite whatever shit screamy right wing trolls have to say. But anyway, let’s talk Iron People, written by The Bendis. I love the idea of a repentant Victor Von Doom, a VVD that has been in the egomaniacal supervillain game so long that he truly doesn’t know how best to be a hero, even while being an unstoppable combination of technology and magic. It’s captivating, especially when SPOILERS his mother shows up, apparently in cahoots with a man who has been mysteriously absent in the current Marvel world: None other than Reed Richards. Sign. Me. Up.

It needs to be said that Alex Maleev’s artwork is a perfect pairing for the subject matter of Infamous Iron Man, and that brings me to my rant for the week, inspired by this of all goddamn things:

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Yep. THIS came out this week. Why? I have no fucking clue. This isn’t “You put chocolate in my peanut butter”, this is “You stuck a banana in my Faygo Jello mold”. It’s a nostalgia trip cash-grab, end of story. BUT, then we get to the backup story, The Snagglepuss Chronicles. Things get sort of uncanny valley in this part of the comic.

See, the art, while beautifully rendered by folks who are clearly quite talented, kinda ruins Snagglepuss and his friends. This is a cartoon character, doing cartoon things in a cartoon setting. If you make him look more photo-realistic, it gets creepy in a BIG hurry.

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Now that is some Five Nights at Freddy’s shit right there. I know furries who are actively turned OFF by this.

And this got me thinking. Are publishers and editors making enough of an effort to match artists with writing that suits their strengths, and vice versa? It matters. Shhhhhhhh. YES. IT MATTERS. Let me be clear. I am not saying this art is bad. Far from it. But is it a good look for Snagglepuss? Not so much. Now this gets me thinking about a bunch of titles that are on the chopping block, because I am irked by this creative dissonance. For example, Mother Panic. I love this book. But it’s a dark story, and it needs to look like this:

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And not THIS:

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Again, I’m not saying the latter is bad. But it’s cartoony, with big anime eyes and blocky figures. This is a comic about an emotionally scarred vigilante, who often declares, “Fuck Batman”. You don’t want some clueless parent picking it up for their six year old.

I have this issue with some other books, like my beloved Letter 44, but I try my best to power through. You may not care. But I think creative teams need to take this into consideration, in order to deliver a final product that is tonally in sync and therefore that much more appealing. This inevitably sidetracks me with questions about style, and why more artists aren’t more flexible, but that’s a whole other can of worms for another day.

EDIT: Some updates are in order. First, after reading the Snagglepuss back-up story, I discovered that it has a great message, though I’m still not sure why this character is saying it, drawn in that style, and in this book. Second, it would appear that in a couple issues Mother Panic will be bringing John Paul Leon on board, and his artwork is a much better fit than Shawn Crystal’s is. So, hooray for not dropping a book before doing a little research, and here’s hoping that Shawn gets some gigs that mesh more with his style.

That’s enough from my big mouth for this week. Be sure to check out my nonsense every Thursday, and if you get your friends to stop by as well you’ll make me squee with unbridled joy. And feel free to comment, share what’s in YOUR stack, and debate me on my irritating pet peeves. Be good, and I’ll see you all in seven.

The Stack-2/15/17

In new books on February 16, 2017 at 8:06 pm

I’ll keep the opening banter to a minimum this week, since I’ll be making another post right after this one that will tie into what I want to discuss, and it will hopefully make up for the lack of anything on Sunday.

Wednesday was a deluge of goodness. If you didn’t visit your local shop yet, get off yer rump and fix that situation posthaste. Behold, nerdy mortals:

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God Country #2 (Donny Cates, Geoff Shaw, Jason Wordie, John J. Hill, Gerardo Zaffino-Image): Emmett was an old man suffering through Alzheimer’s, and then for some reason a magic god-forged sword from beyond Earth chose him to wield it so that he might slice up demons. Its former owner and his father aren’t too pleased about this, so it’s time to parley while Emmett comes to terms with the fact that this weapon has returned his memories and life to him. This book is a spiritual successor of sorts to the amazing 2008 Luna Brothers series The Sword. Unintentionally, I’m sure, but the similarities are there. Regardless, this cosmic-mysteries-by-way-of-real-world-Texas-grit yarn is one of the best new books out there.

The Wild Storm #1 (Warren Ellis, Jon Davis-Hunt, Ivan Plascencia, Simon Bowland, Tula Lotay, Jim Lee, Scott Williams, Alex Sinclair-DC): Jim Lee’s Wildstorm universe was a thoroughly 90s superhero concept that made its way from the early Image days to DC Comics. Full of black ops teams, conspiracy theories, and genre action, it really didn’t pop until a Red Bull-swilling, cane-swinging Brit by the name of Warren Ellis got to make his mark on it. With StormWatch, and later The Authority, these ideas soared to glorious new places, with a swagger all their own and page-consuming fight scenes. This latest iteration goes a bit more street-level on the surface, but even darker and more devious below that. It’s going to be one hell of a twenty-four issue ride.

The Mighty Thor #16 (Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, Matthew Wilson, VC’s Joe Sabino, Joe Jusko-Marvel): Thor, right in the middle of Malekith’s war, has been whisked away beyond the edges of space to the place where the Shi’ar gods reside, and they have decided to challenge her to determine who is mightier. To these vicious celestials it’s all a game where mortal lives mean nothing, and Thor does not approve. In fact, she’s going to show these tyrants up by simply being her awesome, benevolent (at least as benevolent as a hammer-wielding superhuman can be) self. Meanwhile, in the Congress of Worlds, Volstagg filibusters by talking about his favorite foods.

Animosity #5 (Marguerite Bennett, Rafael De Latorre, Rob Schwager, Marshall Dillon, Marcelo Maiolo, Mike Rooth-Aftershock): Another fantastic comic that puts the thesis statement of the whole series in one beautifully-executed page! The whole conflict is right there on page one of this issue, as two shrimps who have been sent as emissaries for their kind head to the surface world to speak with the rest of the animals who have been suddenly given human-level consciousness and the power of speech. They wonder what other forms of life have been given these gifts, and if they are just too far down the chain to be taken seriously by larger forms of life. And then a whale eats them. Yep. There’s also goat drama, a big human event, and possibly a dragon attack…?

Unfollow #16 (Rob Williams, Mike Dowling, Quinton Winter, Clem Robins, Matt Taylor-DC/Vertigo): It’s time for the big showdown. Ferrell has revealed that he’s still alive, and he’s given the survivors of his experiment his coordinates in Venezuela. So they’ve hopped on a few helicopters to confront–Oh, he has shot them out of the sky with missiles. I know. Spoilers. But it seems like many of them are still alive. So there’s that. Back in the States, the FBI is trying to shut down the Global Church of Akira, which is more than up to the challenge, what with all the tax-free money they’ve accumulated and the MANY social media followers they’ve amassed. And then, the most thoroughly modern of disasters occurs, which put a big grin on my face. This one I won’t spoil.

There were so many other great books this week, including (brace yourselves) a Rebirth title–Batwoman! What made top of the pile for YOU? Feel free to comment. Seriously. You can. Just try it. It’ll be fun. Comments SHOULD be enabled. I think.

The Stack-1/4/17

In new books on January 4, 2017 at 9:14 pm

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To be perfectly honest, this week was… a tad underwhelming. Not bad. Just underwhelming. But even so, the comics that did come out were full of big time revelations, and unexpected introspection. Twenty-Serpentine is definitely zagging (For more on that unnecessary and obscure reference, go listen to the McElroy brothers do their podcast thing at My Brother, My Brother and Me). Here are some quick thoughts about the first stack of the year:

The Unworthy Thor #3 (Jason Aaron, Kim Jacinto, Olivier Coipel, Matthew Wilson, VC’s Joe Sabino-Marvel): The Odinson continues his journey toward redemption, or at least toward another hammer that he can hit things with. Beta Ray Bill is by his side, as is my new favorite character, the Hel-hound sometimes known as Thori (He is SO good at murdering, you guys), but The Collector and some of Thanos’s minions are in the way. For now. I realize there’s a whole legion of angry fanboys (and maybe fangirls, though I somehow doubt it) out there who are furious about Thor’s fall, and that Jane Foster has taken up the mantle in his place, but I just can’t wrap my head around it. Do you folks REALLY not want anything interesting or challenging to happen to your favorite characters? Why do you even read these things then? Oh. Wait. You’re just misogynists. Right. Got it.

Unfollow #15 (Rob Williams, Mike Dowling, Quinton Winter, Clem Robins-DC/Vertigo): The issue where Rubinstein finally gets what he deserves. We learn more about Akira’s big plan, and that Larry Ferrell has even more plans. I like a nice big quandary to chew on, and in this issue it is presented in the form of the following question: Is a message of peace, that gives hope to people, any less powerful or meaningful if it is a sham perpetrated by an egomaniac?

Faith #7 (Jody Houser, Joe Eisma, Andrew Dalhouse, Marguerite Sauvage, Dave Sharpe-Valiant): This issue was simply about Faith being haunted by visions of the people in her life that have died. There’s a great conversation about why some people enjoy horror stories, while others cannot understand the appeal, too. It’s a rare glimpse of a superhero experiencing survivor’s guilt, and slogging through that kind of rest that is laced with anxiety. It’s a little whiff of zeitgeist.

Moon Knight #10 (Jeff Lemire, Greg Smallwood, Jordie Bellaire, VC’s Cory Petit-Marvel): This run has been so incredibly great across the board, and I’ve gushed about it at length, but dammit I’m going to gush some more. The artwork is a granular, hallucinatory treat, the story of Marc’s struggle with mental illness feels so true and not at all gimmicky, and those panel and page layouts… just awe-inspiring.

Shade the Changing Girl #4 (Cecil Castellucci, Marley Zarcone, Ande Parks, Kelly Fitzpatrick, Saida Temofonte-DC/Vertigo): Shade deals with being human, and in particular a human going through the chaos of being a teenager, with all of the cruelty that it entails. She experiments with making amends, even if it cannot last. Take it from a Shade expert: This book blazes its own poetic trail through madness, and for someone tired of pandering fan service that’s tremendously refreshing.

What was in YOUR stack this week? What’s been making your jaw drop and your imagination dance? Let me know in the comments, and I’ll see you in a few days for a piece on my quest to become good at creating my own comic books. Now go read some floppies, and be sure to get them from your local shop, you pirating heathens.